Browsing Category: "Chinese Children’s Books"

Childhood Reading Series: 7 bilingual picture books

Both my two-year-old twins love to read these 7 bilingual picture books, originally published by Korean company Kyowon.

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Childhood Reading Series: I Am a Blue Cat

I am a Blue Cat, originally written in French with the French title Je suis un chat bleu by Anne Mirman and Eric Gasté, is one of my oldest daughter DD’s favorites.

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The resources my twins are using to acquire Chinese

My twins are doing great in their language development, especially in acquiring Chinese. Here is the list of resources they use to acquire Chinese.

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T’choupi’s lasting attraction

Two years have passed by. DD’s love to T’choupi books didn’t fade with the time. Why?

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The best bilingual book series, with bilingual CD

I just added 8 bilingual books (each book contains a bilingual CD) onto my website. And I am happy to recommend these books to you.

Each bilingual book and bilingual CD set features an excellent selection of 6-10 lovely and fun children’s stories perfect for babies and young children. And the English part is excellent as well, since it is edited by a native English-speaker. The accompanying appealing and colorful cartoons help engage young children and compliment the text.

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Chinese children’s story: Kitty Goes Fishing

Kitty Goes Fishing is a lovely story about a little cat who goes fishing with his Mom. The moral behind this story is to teach children that success comes from staying focused, yìxīnyíyì, meaning with whole heart and mind. It is one of DD’s favorite Chinese children’s stories.

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Chinese folktale: The Snail Girl

For a country which has more than five thousand years of history and a rich culture, folktales are China’s earliest literature. They often include stories of human nature, historical or legendary events, love, and the supernatural, or stories explaining natural phenomena and distinctive landmarks.

Some folktales are beautiful and touching. Some are entertaining and comforting, and some educational. The same as western fairy tales, many Chinese folktales have deep morals for the children to learn and inculcate in themselves. The mentalities and values conveyed in Chinese folktales have impacted many aspects of Chinese culture and personal belief patterns (see Fairy tales for children, now in Chinese).

One common theme of Chinese folktales is love. In old times in China, marriages were arranged, with little or no consent by the parties to be wed, it is not surprising that relationships based exclusively on love were rare.

Yet the persistence of the theme of true love suggests that, despite the harsh constrains of traditional Chinese society made romantic love a distant dream for most, people still cherish this dream secretly in their hearts.

Although the results of romance are often tragic in Chinese folktales, lovers are sometimes allowed the happiness they desire, as shown by this atypical Chinese folktale The Snail Girl.

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T’choupi came to China

When I looked for children’s books to sell on my online bilingual bookstore, I found a popular French educational picture book series, created by French artist Thierry Courtin and published by Nathan Jeunesse. The protagonist of this book series is a curious 3-year-old-boy who looks like a penguin named T’choupi.

I want to know more information about this book series, so I did a research about T’choupi and its creators.

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