How to say chinpmunk, cow, crab and crocodile in Chinese?

Now you know How to say camel, cat, caterpillar and chicken in Chinese?. How about other animals start with c? Here they come: chinpmunk, cow, crab and crocodile.

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Chinese animation – masterpiece of Chinese culture and art, part 4

The following titles are some of the most famous masterpieces that represent the highest level of Chinese animation in technique innovation and aesthetic expression. They are also typical representatives of Chinese culture and art.

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OPOL series: OPOL and child bilingualism

The “one-parent-one language” (OPOL) approach is regarded as the most common family language system in use to attempt to raise bilingual or multilingual children. With the OPOL approach, each parent or caregiver consistently speaks only one language to the child.

It is often believed that consistency or strict OPOL is the key to the succuess of perfect bilingualism.

However, how consistently or strictly we should follow OPOL rule?

Do we have to pretend not to understand if the child asks us something in the non-target language? Can we switch language in front of children when talking outside of the four walls? Can we allow a certain degree of language-switching, code-mixing, or flexibility? Do extra “language supplements,” such as playgroups, visits from family, or a trip to the country, help children achieve perfect bilingualism if OPOL is not religously followed?

As a parent who is greatly interested in brining up baby bilingual, I particularly want to find out answers to these questions, and discover a realistic way to adapt OPOL to suit my family.

I am beginning a new series on the topics of OPOL. Today, I am reviewing some research done on OPOL system and child bilingualism.

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Chinese animation – masterpiece of Chinese culture and art, part 3

The following titles are some of the most famous masterpieces that represent the highest level of Chinese animation in technique innovation and aesthetic expression. They are also typical representatives of Chinese culture and art.

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How to say camel, cat, caterpillar and chicken in Chinese?

Now you know how to say animals starting with the letter b (see How to say bee, bird, bull and butterfly in Chinese?), which animals start with c? Here they come, camel, cat, caterpillar and chicken.

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Chinese animation – masterpiece of Chinese culture and art, part 1

For many Chinese who were born after 1970s, watching Chinese animation, mostly produced by Shanghai Animation Film Studio, was a remarkably beautiful and memorable part of their childhood.

With their refined brush strokes and fountain of colors and creativity, Chinese animated films are well-known worldwide for its unique artistic style, so called the “Chinese School”. They not only include cartoons, but also puppet films, paper-cut films, and many other categories.

The stories often come from children’s stories, fairy tales and Chinese folk tales. Then the stories were projected into films with a fantastic, humorous, and vivid appeal by a special artistic approach.

For these reasons and more, Chinese animated films have earned more than 200 national & international film festival awards. It is one of the Chinese film genres winning the most international prizes.

The following titles are some of the most famous masterpieces that represent the highest level of Chinese animation in technique innovation and aesthetic expression.

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More opportunities to study in China under the 100,000 Strong Initiative

In my opinion, all children, whose native tongue is not Chinese, should learn Chinese as second language. Learning Chinese will give the younger generation a sharp-edge advantage in every aspect of their future life, strategically, culturally, and practically (see Why children should learn Chinese?)

Now, more and more college students are encouraged to study in China, thanks to U.S. President Barack Obama’s “100,000 Strong Initiative” which aims to increase the number of U.S. college students studying in China to 100,000 by 2014.

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How to say bee, bird, bull and butterfly in Chinese?

Now you know how to say animals starting with the letter b (see How to say bat, bear, beaver and beetle in Chinese?), which vegetables and fruits start with c? Here they come, bee, bird, bull and butterfly in Chinese.

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Multiple-ways to learn Chinese ancient poems

I began to read Chinese ancient poems to DD when I was five months pregnant with DD (see Fetal education in 5th month). After her birth, I often read to her simple but popular Chinese ancient poems, a most highly regarded literary genre in Chinese classical literature.

Unlike “western culture, which was influenced by Shakespeare, Milton, and the Romantic poets, had a pronounced tendency to think of poems as ornate, elaborate creations made by a few men of genius” (Dr. Wheeler, 2011), Chinese culture had a tendency to think of poem-writing as a favorite pastime for all educated men or women to express the emotions of themselves.

Therefore, Chinese poets and artists concentrate heavily on history of humanity, the beauties of nature and landscape, love, friendship, courtship and marriage, and even everyday trials.

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E-reading pen: an interactive tool to learn Chinese

After talking with that local mom of a two-year-old, I decided to add more Chinese/bilingual books with CD/VCD/DVD into the bookstore (see Chinese/Bilingual books with CD/VCD/DVD will be added), so that children and parents can listen to the story narrated in clear Chinese via CDs, or watch the videos, which is often accompanied with animated cartoons, via TV or computer.

One day, when I searched online for Chinese/bilingual books with CD/VCD/DVD, I run into a video showing a Chinese little boy using a specially designed electronic pointer pen to touch pages in a colorful children’s picture book.

When the electronic pointer pen touches the pages, either images or texts, the coresponding Chinese words, phrases, paragraphs, or dialogues are read loudly by the pen in clearn mandarin. Sometimes, a song with lovely music comes out of the pen when the pen touches an image.

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Best4Future’s first Spanish/English bilingual children’s books

Since the grand opening of Best 4 Future bilingual bookstore, I have been thinking and looking for children’s books of other languages, such as French, Germany, Spanish, Japanese and etc.

The big question is: where can I find those books? Do I need to travel to those countries, for an instance, France, to purchase French children’s books and bring them back to the US?

With limited capital I have right now, it is straightly impossible.

“So I have to wait until I save enough money from the sales of Chinese children’s books”, I thought and sighed, putting the dream to the back of my mind.

Until one day, about one week ago, I received a comment for Best 4 Future blog.

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How strictly or consistently do we need to follow OPOL?

Two months ago, I published a post named Why she speaks more English than Chinese? I want to find out why DD speaks more English than Chinese even I have been creating a Chinese-rich environment since her birth (see How I help my baby acquire a second language?).

One reason I figured, maybe also the most important reason, is that I didn’t strictly follow One Parents One Language (OPOL) rule. I read to DD in English as well, only because sometimes she got tired of our limited stock of Chinese books and wanted something different. This is the only time I don’t speak Chinese to her.

Is it the very reason causing her to speak more English than Chinese?

I am not sure. But I do agree that OPOL is the the best and the easiest method for parents to bring up a baby bilingual.

The question is: how strictly or consistently do we need to follow OPOL?

There are a lot of theoreis and a lot of debates. I found two interesting articles from http://www.multilingualliving.com. One is The OPOL-Fanatics from Christiane Küchler Williams. The other is An Apology for Being “Inconsistent” from Alice Lapuerta.

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Chinese mythology: The Magic Locus Lantern

There is no doubt that storytelling in China, as elsewhere, is as old as its civilization. People have been telling stories for millennia to educate and entertain. Chinese parents and grandparents have been using storytelling to make their children and grandchildren aware of the importance of academic advancement and filial piety. (Pearson and Rao 2003, 131–146).

One of the stories that have been known and loved by generations of Chinese children is The Magic Locus Lantern.

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Chinese/Bilingual books with CD/VCD/DVD will be added

After the grand opening, the online bilingual bookstore has been receiving a flood of traffic from all over the world. But I noticed there was more surfing than ordering from these potential customers. Why?

A local mother of a two-year-old unveiled the myth.

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A wicked Halloween surprise

I sat in front of the computer, staring at the screen of the monitor.

The web browser displayed, clearly, “The website cannot display the page. Most likely causes: the website is under maintenance; the website has a programming error.”

What is going on? I wondered. I just checked this website address (www.Best4Future.com) this morning. Everything went on perfectly. How come the site was down?!

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Why she speaks more English than Chinese?

To be honest, I was a bit disappointed. I talked to her in Chinese since her birth. I tried to create a Chinese-rich environment for her. Since I am the only person who speaks Chinese in her world, I tried to speak only Chinese to her.

When she was nine month, I began to read simple books to her in Chinese. Since month 13, I started to read story books to her in Chinese. We also listened to Chinese children songs, rhymes and stories via CDs, and watched Chinese animated movies via DVDs.

I did everything I could to help her acquire Chinese (see How I help my baby acquire a second language?). Why she speaks English more than Chinese?

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Chinese mythology: Nezha Riots the Seas

Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written tradition, including creation myths and legends and myths concerning the founding of Chinese culture and the Chinese state. Like many mythologies, it has in the past been believed to be, at least in part, a factual recording of history.

One of the major vernacular Chinese epic fantasy novels written about myths and legends is Fengshen Yanyi, translated as The Investiture of the Gods or The Creation of the Gods.

There all altogether 100 stories in Fengshen Yanyi, in which numerous elements of Chinese mythology are intertwined, including gods and goddesses, immortals and spirits.

One story is about a little boy named Nezha. The story about him is called Nezha Riots the Seas, also called also known as Nezha Conquers the Dragon King. It is an exciting classical Chinese folk tale that has been known and loved by generations of Chinese children.

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An excellent resource for Chinese learning

Today, I am so glad to find an excellent resource for Chinese learning. And I am so excited to share with you.

It is called Confucius Institute Online, a comprehensive website (http://chinese.cn/en) for Chinese learning. It is built and sponsored by Hanban/Confucius Institute Headquarters, a Chinese government agency, with the purpose of promoting the understanding of Chinese language and culture, as well as enhancing the educational and cultural cooperation between China and the world.

Confucius Institutes Online (http://chinese.cn/en) offers Chinese language courses for various age groups and language levels, and provides information and consultative services concerning Chinese education, culture, economy and society.

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How to say bat, bear, beaver and beetle in Chinese?

Now you know how to say alligator, ant, anteater and armadillo in Chinese. How about bat, bear, beaver and beetle? Do you want to know how to say them in Chinese?

Let’s get started.

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Chinese mythology: Pangu and Nüwa

Out of the Chinese story books DD’s uncle sent to her, there was one book talking about the creators of the world: Pangu and Nüwa. Although this book is bit deep for DD’s age, I still read to her once a while.

This book features a synthesis of three stories about Pangu and Nüwa from classical Chinese mythology, which is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written tradition, including creation myths and legends and myths concerning the founding of Chinese culture and the Chinese state.

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