Best4Future’s first Spanish/English bilingual children’s books

Since the grand opening of Best 4 Future bilingual bookstore, I have been thinking and looking for children’s books of other languages, such as French, Germany, Spanish, Japanese and etc.

The big question is: where can I find those books? Do I need to travel to those countries, for an instance, France, to purchase French children’s books and bring them back to the US?

With limited capital I have right now, it is straightly impossible.

“So I have to wait until I save enough money from the sales of Chinese children’s books”, I thought and sighed, putting the dream to the back of my mind.

Until one day, about one week ago, I received a comment for Best 4 Future blog.

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How strictly or consistently do we need to follow OPOL?

Two months ago, I published a post named Why she speaks more English than Chinese? I want to find out why DD speaks more English than Chinese even I have been creating a Chinese-rich environment since her birth (see How I help my baby acquire a second language?).

One reason I figured, maybe also the most important reason, is that I didn’t strictly follow One Parents One Language (OPOL) rule. I read to DD in English as well, only because sometimes she got tired of our limited stock of Chinese books and wanted something different. This is the only time I don’t speak Chinese to her.

Is it the very reason causing her to speak more English than Chinese?

I am not sure. But I do agree that OPOL is the the best and the easiest method for parents to bring up a baby bilingual.

The question is: how strictly or consistently do we need to follow OPOL?

There are a lot of theoreis and a lot of debates. I found two interesting articles from http://www.multilingualliving.com. One is The OPOL-Fanatics from Christiane Küchler Williams. The other is An Apology for Being “Inconsistent” from Alice Lapuerta.

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Chinese mythology: The Magic Locus Lantern

There is no doubt that storytelling in China, as elsewhere, is as old as its civilization. People have been telling stories for millennia to educate and entertain. Chinese parents and grandparents have been using storytelling to make their children and grandchildren aware of the importance of academic advancement and filial piety. (Pearson and Rao 2003, 131–146).

One of the stories that have been known and loved by generations of Chinese children is The Magic Locus Lantern.

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Chinese/Bilingual books with CD/VCD/DVD will be added

After the grand opening, the online bilingual bookstore has been receiving a flood of traffic from all over the world. But I noticed there was more surfing than ordering from these potential customers. Why?

A local mother of a two-year-old unveiled the myth.

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A wicked Halloween surprise

I sat in front of the computer, staring at the screen of the monitor.

The web browser displayed, clearly, “The website cannot display the page. Most likely causes: the website is under maintenance; the website has a programming error.”

What is going on? I wondered. I just checked this website address (www.Best4Future.com) this morning. Everything went on perfectly. How come the site was down?!

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Why she speaks more English than Chinese?

To be honest, I was a bit disappointed. I talked to her in Chinese since her birth. I tried to create a Chinese-rich environment for her. Since I am the only person who speaks Chinese in her world, I tried to speak only Chinese to her.

When she was nine month, I began to read simple books to her in Chinese. Since month 13, I started to read story books to her in Chinese. We also listened to Chinese children songs, rhymes and stories via CDs, and watched Chinese animated movies via DVDs.

I did everything I could to help her acquire Chinese (see How I help my baby acquire a second language?). Why she speaks English more than Chinese?

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Chinese mythology: Nezha Riots the Seas

Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written tradition, including creation myths and legends and myths concerning the founding of Chinese culture and the Chinese state. Like many mythologies, it has in the past been believed to be, at least in part, a factual recording of history.

One of the major vernacular Chinese epic fantasy novels written about myths and legends is Fengshen Yanyi, translated as The Investiture of the Gods or The Creation of the Gods.

There all altogether 100 stories in Fengshen Yanyi, in which numerous elements of Chinese mythology are intertwined, including gods and goddesses, immortals and spirits.

One story is about a little boy named Nezha. The story about him is called Nezha Riots the Seas, also called also known as Nezha Conquers the Dragon King. It is an exciting classical Chinese folk tale that has been known and loved by generations of Chinese children.

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An excellent resource for Chinese learning

Today, I am so glad to find an excellent resource for Chinese learning. And I am so excited to share with you.

It is called Confucius Institute Online, a comprehensive website (http://chinese.cn/en) for Chinese learning. It is built and sponsored by Hanban/Confucius Institute Headquarters, a Chinese government agency, with the purpose of promoting the understanding of Chinese language and culture, as well as enhancing the educational and cultural cooperation between China and the world.

Confucius Institutes Online (http://chinese.cn/en) offers Chinese language courses for various age groups and language levels, and provides information and consultative services concerning Chinese education, culture, economy and society.

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How to say bat, bear, beaver and beetle in Chinese?

Now you know how to say alligator, ant, anteater and armadillo in Chinese. How about bat, bear, beaver and beetle? Do you want to know how to say them in Chinese?

Let’s get started.

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Chinese mythology: Pangu and Nüwa

Out of the Chinese story books DD’s uncle sent to her, there was one book talking about the creators of the world: Pangu and Nüwa. Although this book is bit deep for DD’s age, I still read to her once a while.

This book features a synthesis of three stories about Pangu and Nüwa from classical Chinese mythology, which is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written tradition, including creation myths and legends and myths concerning the founding of Chinese culture and the Chinese state.

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